FAQ's

What is chlamydia?

Chlamydia is the most common STI in the UK and is most prevalent in young people under 25 years old. Chlamydia is easily passed from one person to another through unprotected sex or sexual contact (e.g. not using a condom).

What are the symptoms?

Most people with chlamydia don’t get any symptoms. If you do get symptoms you might notice:

  • Unusual vaginal discharge
  • Pain when peeing or having sex
  • Bleeding after sex or between periods
  • Pelvic pain (pain in the lower part of the stomach) or painful testicles

If you have any of these symptoms you should see a health professional.

Why should I get tested?

If chlamydia is not treated it can cause pain in the pelvis, ectopic pregnancy and infertility. This risk is increased if you get the infection repeatedly.

What does the test involve?

The test is free, simple and confidential. All you need to do request a postal kit, give a urine sample or self-taken vaginal swab and post it back to us in the envelope provided. We will then contact you with your results.

What if I have chlamydia?

If you have chlamydia you will be given antibiotics to treat the infection.

What happens if I get chlamydia when I'm pregnant?

Chlamydia may be linked to early miscarriage or premature birth of the baby. It can be passed to the baby during the birth and (less commonly) before the baby is born, which can cause inflammation and discharge from the baby's eye (conjunctivitis) and pneumonia. Chlamydia can be treated with antibiotics when you are pregnant and when you are breastfeeding. The antibiotics won't harm the baby, but do tell the doctor or nurse that you are pregnant to make sure the correct type of antibiotic is used.

How regularly should I get a chlamydia test?

If you’re under 25 years old and sexually active, you should get tested for chlamydia annually or when you change your sexual partner.

If you have any more questions about the B-Clear Chlamydia Screening Kit, please feel free to call us on 0800 032 0899 or email us at info@b-clear.org.uk